HIV/AIDS and Lung Cancer

HIV/AIDS and Lung Cancer

"Smoking was determined to be the primary factor in the development of lung cancer."

According to researchers at the University of California located in San Francisco, there is a noticeable increase in the amount of HIV and AIDS patients being diagnosed with lung cancer. There seems to be some correlation between having HIV/AIDS and developing lung cancer. That correlation appears to be smoking. In their studies, it was determined that HIV/AIDS patients who previously smoked were more susceptible to having undiagnosed respiratory and pulmonary infections which were untreated. This contributes to the likelihood of developing lung cancer. Of course, lung cancer is often diagnosed in HIV patients who have already been diagnosed with AIDS.

The findings were that out of the 3763 women and 6972 men tested, the majority of the women by almost 75% percent and 42% of the men had lung cancer.  They were most likely to be of African American heritage, a smoker and have used drugs at some point in their lives either out of necessity or recreation. Women were also the majority leader for the development of lung cancer versus men. Age, positive HIV status and the lack of a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) also play factors.  

Smoking was determined to be the primary factor in the development of lung cancer. Another important distinction was that the risk for women is almost double than that it is for a man regardless of how many years they smoked, how long ago they smoked and how old they were. This study was only done on smokers but, so far the results have been astounding and insightful. Now that scientists have discovered a link it is important to raise awareness in the HIV/AIDS community to help increase the health and longevity of those infected.